The weather has been a bit mad lately, hasn’t it? I’m not just talking about the freakishly hot weather the UK is experiencing for the first time since the 70s – I’m talking about mini tsunamis in Spain, tent-stealing tornadosin Germany, people cooking food on their cars in Japan, and now this giant sandstorm in China.

On 25 July, a giant and ferocious sandstorm hit the city of Golmud, in China’s northwestern Qinghai Province, with accompanying winds that reached whopping speeds of 20.7 meters per second, according to China Global Television Network.

It came out of nowhere at around 7.30pm and yet within minutes the entire suburb of Golmud was enveloped beneath a giant blanket of snow and dust.

This footage captured by a resident of the town shows the storm unfolding, in what looks like a scene from one of those ‘the end is nigh’ scary movies.

It looks bloody terrifying – and yet people are still trying to lead us to believe that climate change isn’t a thing? Maybe it’s worth considering that the evidence seems to be racking up.

Credit: Weibo

The force of the winds ripped trees from their roots and spat them on to the roads, so driving in such poor circumstances could be dangerous. Golmud police issued warnings through loudspeakers and flashed emergency lights to keep residents out of harm’s way.

Thankfully nobody has been hurt in the unexpected storm, but residents have been instructed to drive at a maximum speed of 25 miles per hour due the sheer lack of visibility.

Sounds bloody awful doesn’t it? But this sort of thing doesn’t shock the city’s residents.

Golmud’s position, located high up on the Tibetan Plateau, makes the city no stranger to random episodes of freak weather – although the last time it suffered a sandstorm to this extreme was in 2015.

For example, just last week the city was covered in a blanket of snow, while a couple of days ago it was bloody lashing it down. Poor sods. Give me an abnormally long British heatwave any day.

Credit: PA

Still, we’re due a hail storm here in the UK today. It goes from one extreme to another, doesn’t it?

The Met Office has extended the yellow weather warning for thunderstorms as scorching temperatures give way for torrential downpours. Scattered thunderstorms hit parts of Britain today and tomorrow’s rain could bring more than two inches in a few hours. Urgh. The Sun reports that the heaviest rain will fall in eastern and northern England, with drier weather further to the west.