The Northeastern Research Institute of Petrified Wood and Mineral Resources from the Nakhon Ratchasima Rajabhat University reported the discovery of a brand new species of carnivorous dinosaur in Nakhon Ratchasima Province. The newly discovered hunter is nicknamed as “Siam Raptor Suwati”.

The dinosaur is named after Thailand’s original name combined with the fact that this is a hunter dinosaur and the name Suwati is in honor of the Former Deputy Prime Minister. He has been supporting the research of the Institute for over 25 years from the moment that they started. The Siam Raptor was discovered from a total of 22 fossils from at least 4 Siam Raptor Suwati dinosaurs. Predatory dinosaurs hunted down other animals such as mammals and many of them preferred eating other dinosaurs both herbivore and carnivore dinosaurs. The most famous predatory dinosaur was the T-rex often placed as a centerpiece in dinosaur movies and comic books known as a ruthless giant monster with 2 tiny claws on each hand extended from the enormous body.

Credit: INN News
Credit: INN News

The Siam Raptor is the latest discovery of a Carnivore Dinosaur and is also the biggest predatory dinosaur discovered today in Thailand. It is at least 8 meters long calculated from the fossil parts that are in good condition.  It belongs to the Allosauroidea a superfamily of Carnosauria dinosaurs.

This is the 12th predatory dinosaur discovered in Thailand thanks to the teamwork of Thai and Japanese researchers in Nakhon Ratchasima. The institute started at least 20 years ago on the petrified wood discoveries and research that lead to developments in fossil research today. Suwat Lipalop the Former Deputy Prime Minister and the Council President of Nakhon Ratchasima Rajabhat University stated that he is extremely grateful and honored that both Thai and Japanese researchers recognize his support for the institution by naming the new dinosaur in his name.

Credit: INN News
Credit: INN News

FB Caption: This is the 12th predatory dinosaur discovered in Thailand thanks to the teamwork of Thai and Japanese researchers in Nakhon Ratchasima.

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