Whether it’s a cheeky cocktail by the pool or a swift one on the beach, everyone likes to let loose and have a few bevs while on holiday. However, it turns out that just one pint could invalidate your travelinsurance claim, according to the folk at Money Saving Expert.

It may come as a bit of a surprise to many people, but apparently if you’ve had a drink alcohol on holiday and end up losing something or have an accident, then your insurance policy may not cover you – yup, even if it was ‘only one or two’.

MSE says that advice for travellers is hazy, as many insurers’ guidelines list anything from the slightly vague ‘drinking too much’ and ‘alcoholic abuse’ through to ‘approximately four pints’.

While this isn’t the crystal-clear answer holidaymakers would want, the idea is that insurers look at whether or not the person making the claim has had enough alcohol to impair judgement, and in turn cause effect to decision-making.

This is where one pint could invalidate insurance claims for some, as everyone has different tolerances to alcohol.

Some holidaymakers could find it difficult to bring make their claims to insurers if they’re unable to prove that alcohol wasn’t involved with their accident or incident.

It was reported in January that the insurance company Aviva said it does not cover any claim for death, injury or disability resulting from misuse of alcohol or drugs.

Direct Line, under its general exclusions, says it will not pay out to any claim made ‘as a result of you drinking so much that your judgement is seriously affected’.

On ITV’s This Morning, Martin Lewis also recently warned holidaymakers about neglecting to check the expiry date of their passport, as this could end in trips being cancelled.

He recommended that passports should have at least six months left before expiring before holidaymakers look to travel, as there are some countries that require travellers to have that six months of validity when planning to travel internationally.

Some countries won’t even permit someone to enter that country if their passport is due to expire within six months of their final day of travel.

This rule only really applies for those travelling outside of Europe to the Middle East and Asia – if you are unsure there is an easy way to check the validity entry requirements for the country you are travelling to as you can always check on the foreign and commonwealth website.

Source: Lad Bible